SOS: Help with Digital Humanities Project Needed

"Weltmeisterschaft 2014" by Jürgen Lousberg (CC BY-ND 2.0)

“Weltmeisterschaft 2014” by Jürgen Lousberg (CC BY-ND 2.0)

The World Cup is over, Germany gets the fourth star, and I get back to work.

My investigation into the extent to which cerebral plasticity researchers and brain sex/gender difference researchers talked to each other over the course of the 20th century is a bit challenging. I’ve been reading and thinking and emailing people and writing and thinking and reading and attending a Digital Humanities (DH) conference—and suddenly I realized that what I’m doing here is totally a DH project. More importantly, it’s one I need help with. Continue reading

Don’t Freak out about the Weird Header …

… I’m doing enough of that already!1 Only a few more days of maintenance at hypotheses.org, and we’ll hopefully have the neuroscience-y header back:

cropped-cropped-cropped-cropped-cropped-Header1.pngBut let’s distract ourselves with research content and let me introduce my current summer project to you: Continue reading

  1. Congratulations to you if you’re reading this in your RSS inbox and don’t know what I’m writing about. []

NeuroGenderings III: So Many Women Saying Smart Things in a Conference Room

From May 8–10, 2014, more than a hundred students and scholars from the neurosciences, social sciences, and the humanities convened at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, for the NeuroGenderings III conference. The organizers Cynthia Kraus (University of Lausanne) and Anelis Kaiser (University of Bern) titled this meeting the “1st international Dissensus Conference on brain and gender.” 14 papers by scholars at different career stages, mainly from Europe and the US, provided examples of successful sex/gender-sensitive brain research and addressed problematic neuroscientific concepts and practices from feminist and queer perspectives. The four keynote speakers illustrate the diversity of approaches: Rebecca Jordan-Young (Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies, Barnard College), Gillian Einstein (Social & Behavioural Health Sciences, University of Toronto), Georgina Rippon (Psychology, Aston University), and Anne Fausto-Sterling (Molecular Biology, Cell Biology & Biochemistry and Gender Studies, Brown University). Papers were selected by the NeuroGenderings Network, a non-institutionalized interdisciplinary group of scholars, which was founded in 2010 to offer a platform for exchanging best practice models for and reservations against sex/gender research in the neuroscientific realm. All attendees consented that dissenting from unquestioned concepts and practices in brain research can benefit both our neuroscientific knowledge and our social life. Continue reading