More Book Summaries: Sex/Gender and Race in Genetics + Animals in the Lab and in the ‘Wild’

I just finished another set of readings for my orals list on “History of American Post-War Science and Feminism” with Susan Lindee. Read my summaries below and make sure to check out Etienne Benson’s site with many more resources on “wilderness” and STS. Continue reading

Book Summaries: The First 3^3 Items from My Brain List

Today, I’m posting my first summarizing essay for my “History of the Skull, Mind, and Brain Sciences” list for you. I’m reading the items from this list with John Tresch, who is my main advisor. Be warned: it’s 14 single-spaced pages in Palatino Linotype 11p with 1-inch margins. Continue reading

What Kind of a Sex/Gender Model Do We Need in the Lab?

Do you remember my post about the all-too-easy concept of attending to sex and gender in biomedical research (“What Kind of Sex Do We Need in the Lab?”)? Sarah Richardson and her colleagues just published a very insightful, informative, and important piece that is much more scientifically sophisticated than my short statement. “Focus on Preclinical Sex Differences Will Not Address Women’s and Men’s Health Disparities,” so the title. Check it out!

Thanks are due to Londa Schiebinger who, as so often, drew my attention to the publication through her Gendered Innovations newsletter.

Book Summaries: History, Tools, and Practices of Genetics and Hereditary Science

Here comes another contribution to my summaries for my list with Susan Lindee. Topic of the day: “History, Tools, and Practices of Genetics and Hereditary Science.” My original notes are much longer than what I provide in this essay, but I have a maximum of six pages to deliver. So I had to cut some of my observations. Have fun! Continue reading

More Book Summaries! Today: Sorting People Out and Digital Technologies

Last Wednesday, I had another orals meeting with Susan Lindee. You can find the bibliographical details of the books discussed in the blurb and my analytical essay below that. Guess which book I liked least! Continue reading

Get Your Book Summaries Here! Today: Non-Pure Science

I virtually just started reading towards comprehensive oral exams (= orals). I’m writing this post after having finished my third and, luckily, last book for tonight. Instead of taking notes on the 1,000 pages I read today, I want to share my summarizing essay for last week’s meeting with you. Continue reading

ALL SHALL COME: Sorting Brains Out—Best Conference in a While

The conference I’ve been so busy with is finally coming together. We’re convening on September 18 and 19, shortly before the Pope comes to Philly (why does nobody really care about the Dalai Lama’s coming?!), and we’ll be discussing the history of the mind and brain sciences in the past 125 years. Check out the details here and look at our gorgeous poster below (thanks to Wing (Dyana) So, Ian Verstegen, and the Visual Studies Program at Penn)!

Guys, I’m so excited. And I don’t even want to hide it!

Yeah, yeah, yeah!! Designed by Wing T. (Dyana) So.

Yeah, yeah, yeah!!
Designed by Wing T. (Dyana) So.

Check out My Next Talk

Not sure how far the news have spread that Penn’s Digital Humanities Forum, with a nice amount of extra money, recently became the Price Lab for Digital Humanities. On September 16, I’ll be giving a short talk on the knowledge I acquired during my Price-Lab-funded trip to HILT this summer. The talk mainly concerns how I plan to use textmining with R for my project on the history of adult neurogenesis.

Please Take Part in a Survey on Sex/Gender Concepts in Scientific Research

A colleague of mine from Berlin, Diana Schellenberg, needs participants for her survey on the categories of sex and gender in neuro- and psy-scientific research. I’m posting her call for participants below. Please consider following this link and completing the survey. I won’t lie, so I must say it takes some effort. But if you do it in four sessions or so, you get four nice little procrastination breaks. Continue reading

DH and Me

I’m in Indianapolis for HILT 2015. The digital-humanities workshop on “Large-Scale Text Analysis with R” sounded as if it can help me to finally surmount the obstacle of several thousands of neuroscientific articles I will have to analyze in order to continue my project on adult neurogenesis. Mark Algee-Hewitt from Stanford’s Department of English is an awesome instructor and thus far, I’ve understood everything and was even able to ask a not-so-stupid question during the first session. (Why does R return “character” when I ask about the class of a vector whose contents are characters—and not “vector”?)

I know I promised to continue this post a long time ago—odds are that it will happen soon.