Lecture 09/24: A French Revolution in Medicine

https://www.flickr.com/photos/10699036@N08/2353185908/in/photolist-4zWGbQ-4zSrRp-81KXwy-oH2Vf-bs5mCC-8xWZ5x-9xHL7s-9xEQxp-9okAH6-c8vs1N-7DhjtZ-9xHQF7-9xHUn3-9xEYDP-9xHPL3-9xEWY6-9xEXLi-c8vt9N-c8vsFb-c8vspw-9oDA2r-6VC8C2-du8qH3-9wozwW-du2R3c-61nTsD-61s74d-9ooxos-du8mCf-du8gXh-du8sFN-du8jh5-du8pML-7DhGhT-7Dhj3r-9okwCe-7DhjNi-7DhGJn-du8eBG-7DmtYq-du8o1y-du8few-9okyai-7Dmtrj-7DhEDD-6VC8BR-9ooBeS-aEqrYK-aEmJoB-du2Gyk/

”Paris, Pitié-Salpêtrière: statue du Docteur Pinel” by Frédérique PANASSAC, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 

Three weeks ago, I started teaching. And I love it! My students are adorable, they are smart and polite, and they laugh about almost all of my jokes (the only exception is that nobody seemed to find it funny that I thought Cambodia is an African country until I was in my teens—maybe they still believe it themselves??). Yay to teaching!

If you want to see me in action, join the first lecture I will be giving: Beth Linker, for whose Medicine in History lecture course I’m teaching two recitation sections, invited me to guest lecture this Wednesday, 10–11 am. So if you don’t have anything better to do (and what could be better than that?), sneak into Claudia Cohen Hall 402.—More input on my work to follow shortly. I have to read (and talk) about the French Revolution in Medicine first.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *